Registered Education Savings Plan

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Registered Education Savings Plan

In Canada, an account into which a person makes contributions up to a certain limit in order to save for a university education and from which he/she begins to take distributions to pay for tuition and other expenses. A Registered Education Savings Plan allows for tax deductible contributions and taxable distributions; that is, contributions are tax-deferred until withdrawals are made. Registered Educations Savings Plans may be invested in securities and usually own common stock and certificates of deposit. See also: Registered Retirement Savings Plan.
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For more information on RESPs and new options, check out their LinkedIn page at https://www.
The company offers many options for RESPs, including tax-deferred plans for rapid capital growth.
Global Banking News-September 12, 2012--BMO study says Canadian parents looking for financial help from RESPs to fund children's education(C)2012 ENPublishing - http://www.
A survey by Bank of Montreal (NYSE: BMO) has indicated that more Canadian parents are turning to RESPs to fund their children's education.
FXGTM: RESP (Asp +) is a sensitive and specific assay designed to aid healthcare professionals involved in the diagnosis and treatment of fungal pneumonia.
FXGTM: RESP (Asp +) is the first in a pipeline of products from Myconostica designed to assist in the diagnosis of fungal disease.
The maximum contribution to an RESP is $4,000 per year per beneficiary.
Unlike funds within an RRSP, those within an RESP face no foreign investment restrictions.
If you're worried about investing in an RESP because you're not sure if your child will actually go onto post-secondary education, there's no need.
If your child does not pursue post-secondary education and no other RESP beneficiary is named, the CESG must be refunded to the government.
The primary effect of RESPs is to add needless complexity to Canada's tax system," said Kevin Milligan, assistant professor of economics at the University of British Columbia and author of the study, entitled "Tax Preferences for Education Saving: Are RESPs Effective?
In an RESP, there is always the risk that there will be no eligible beneficiary to receive the income generated on the capital contributions.