Queue Discipline

Queue Discipline

The rules a company or other organization follows to process orders, inventory, or other things that it receives. For example, a queue discipline may handle things as they are received or may categorize them by importance. See also: LIFO, FIFO.
References in periodicals archive ?
The main focus of this article is twofold: (i) it proposes an alternative queue discipline for the three server queues with stalling investigated by Sivasamy et al.
However, Krishnamoorthi [2] analysed a suitable 'm-policy' on a Poisson queue with one fast and one slow server that can successfully operate under FCFS queue discipline.
It should be noted that there is no exhaustive research pursuing to estimate the impact of the queue discipline and network traffic properties on the network node traffic service.
The node with the buffer queue discipline LIFO serves better for high traffic loads.
Trailers were placed in line at the gin with a first-come-first-serve queue discipline.
If the queue discipline in a certain grocery store line is first-come, first-served, no more than ten items, customers count each other's items and may forcefully object to a number over ten.
The queue discipline is to call the next person in the line to the next available teller, airline-counter attendant, telephone operator, or career counselor, who renders a single service in a single phase.
This causes interruptions for the receptionists and a slight violation of queue discipline as they instruct people to get numbers.
The average or maximum value of a qualitative variable such as queue discipline makes no sense.
But if that was a move dictated by temper rather than by scientific inquiry, as those who spread the crank talk would have us believe, how does one explain the scholarly article it produced--"How Stiff the Upper Lip: British Queue Discipline Under Stress in the West End of London" (Lineup: A Canadian Journal of Waiting, Fall 1962)?
Canadians are more irritated by poor queue discipline than their American counterparts with 29 percent reporting that they are most annoyed by people who crowd the boarding line, compared with only 20 percent of U.