Qiyas


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Qiyas

An Arabic term for analogy. Qiyas is used in Islamic law to deal with new situations as they arise. For example, the Quran forbids the use of alcohol but does not mention narcotics. Because alcohol and narcotics are both intoxicating, one may use qiyas to determine that Islamic law forbids narcotics as well. This has implications in Islamic finance.
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This year, GESS Dubai welcomes the biggest Saudi presence to date with the participation of the Ministry of Saudi Arabia, QIYAS (Education Evaluation Commission), Colleges of Excellence and other key companies.
The selected students need to pass the Qiyas tests on math, physics, chemistry, biology and English," he said.
What they do not regard, even remotely, is that this is the 21st century and with time, changes in rules and regulations can take place, a phenomenon to which Islam does not object, also evident from of Qiyas (opinion) and Ijma (consensus) sources of Islamic law.
illa ("cause"), which was to dominate discussions of qiyas in classical legal theory, is missing.
Islam is practiced based on four primary sources of Islamic teaching; (1) Qur'an, with 114 surah/ chapters (2) Sunnah/ Hadith/ Prophetic Tradition (3) Ijma' (unanimous consensus among jurist/ ulama' ) and (4) Qiyas (decision by analogy) (Rehman and Ahmedov, 2011).
The interaction between maqasid al-shari'a (objectives of Islamic law) and qiyas (deductive analogy) provides a supplementary tool for interpreting the failure of the prior in terms of the practical misuse of the latter by Islamic banks.
333) applies the methodology of qiyas (analogical reasoning) and reasons that the emerging and increasing types of wealth in the Modern times such as bank deposits and financial securities like shares and bonds are also Zakatable [Qaradawi (1999)].
One of the major creeds in this concept is its rejection of ijma' (scholarly consensus) and qiyas (analogy) and also its rejection of the sources and methodological foundations of ijtihad (deriving qualified judgment) and taqlid (following qualified judgment).
Qiyas or the use of analogies to ascertain a rule became permitted.
So long as the practices were not found to transgress the sharia--Islamic law as derived from the Qur'an, the Sunnah or the collection of words and deeds of the Prophet Muhammad, the ijma' or consensus of scholars, or qiyas or analogical deduction, they were not considered outside the ambit of the Islamic religion per se.
12) These are followed, in order of importance, by the ijma and the qiyas.
Jurists tended to use the term ijtihad or legal interpretation instead to describe their specific type of investigation, or qiyas , comparison or analogy.