Put price

(redirected from Put Prices)

Put price

The price at which an asset will be sold if a put option is exercised. Also called the strike or exercise price of a put option.

Put Price

The strike price for a put option. When one buys a put option, one buys the right, but not the obligation, to sell a security to the writer of the option at a certain price. This price is called the put price.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Despite Myanmar still being a country largely underserved by mobile services at a current penetration rate of some 11%, future competition between the four operators could turn out to be a tough one and put prices further under pressure.
An MP has voiced concerns that Heathrow Express' bid to run the planned direct link from Reading to the west London airport could put prices out of the reach of Welsh passengers.
They put prices up in November so, in winter, customers are paying a higher price.
Energy firm SSE has hiked their prices by more than 8%, this week British Gas will add more than 9% to customers' bills and next week npower will put prices up 10%.
Stuart Morgan, 31, a project manager from Blyth, said: "If it is there to clean up the mess then fair enough, but as long as it is not just an excuse to put prices up for customers.
Bosses and government were happy to see wages eroded by this inflation while they put prices up in order to increase profits.
Tell supermarkets to put prices up on junk food and down on veg and fresh meat.
That's a massive consideration for Roberto Mancini, who won't want City to fail to qualify for a second successive season, and it's also a consideration as we put prices to their trip to Stoke.
One of the mildest winters on record sharply stunted demand for gas and put prices on the defensive this year, with front-month futures hitting another 10-year low of $2.
The plan was criticised by one Conservative backbencher, MP Philip Davies, who told Mrs Spelman: "She says she is concerned about rising food prices, but she is agitating to bring in a groceries code adjudicator that, if it will have any influence at all, will only be able to put prices up further.
All six put prices up in recent months following increases last winter, blaming rising wholesale costs, and there have been loud calls for cuts after recent falls in wholesale prices.
Large manufacturing firms said they will put prices up at the fastest rate since January, 1989.