Public Utility Holding Company Act of 1935


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Public Utility Holding Company Act of 1935

Legislation intended to eliminate many holding company abuses by reorganizing the financial structures of holding companies in the gas and electric utility industries and regulating their debt and dividend policies.

Public Utility Holding Company Act of 1935

Legislation in the United States limiting the activities of utility companies such as electric companies. Specifically, the Public Utility Holding Company Act requires utility companies to restrict their businesses to either a single state or to a small, manageable geographic area in order to be subject to state regulations. It also requires them to obtain approval from the SEC in order to engage in business unrelated to the utility industry. The Act was passed in response to near monopolistic activities on the part of utility companies. Most of its provisions were repealed in the Public Utility Holding Company Act of 2005.
References in periodicals archive ?
Under the Public Utility Holding Company Act of 1935 (PUHCA 1935) and other laws, federal agencies and state commissions have traditionally regulated utilities to protect consumers from supply disruptions and unfair pricing.
The Public Utility Holding Company Act of 1935 requires utility holding companies to divest operations not integral to their primary operations.
Referencing the West Coast electricity crisis and the Enron bankruptcy, Cantwell argued that the current bill's repeal of the Public Utility Holding Company Act of 1935, which places restrictions on utility mergers, would leave consumers vulnerable to market abuses and rising prices.
Electric and gas utility systems throughout the country voiced strong support for bipartisan legislation introduced to repeal the Public Utility Holding Company Act of 1935.
The Public Utility Holding Company Act of 1935 (PUHCA), which is administered by the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC), subjects public utility holding companies to federal regulation.
Following the repeal of the Public Utility Holding Company Act of 1935 in February 2006, Berkshire exercised the option on its MEHC convertible securities, increasing its diluted voting ownership in MEHC to 86.
FPL Group and FPL are subject to changes in laws or regulations, including the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978, as amended (PURPA), the Public Utility Holding Company Act of 1935, as amended (Holding Company Act), the Federal Power Act, the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended, the Energy Policy Act of 2005 and certain sections of the Florida statutes relating to public utilities, changing governmental policies and regulatory actions, including those of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), the Florida Public Service Commission (FPSC) and the utility commissions of other states in which FPL Group has operations, and the U.
FPL Group is subject to changes in laws or regulations, including the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978, as amended (PURPA), the Public Utility Holding Company Act of 1935, as amended (Holding Company Act), the Federal Power Act, the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended, the Energy Policy Act of 2005 and certain sections of the Florida statutes relating to public utilities, changing governmental policies and regulatory actions, including those of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), the Florida Public Service Commission (FPSC) and the utility commissions of other states in which FPL Group has operations, and the U.

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