Public Sector Deficit

Public Sector Deficit

A situation in which government spending of money exceeds taxes collected. That is, a public sector deficit occurs when a government spends more than it receives in a given period of time, usually a year. The deficit adds to the government's debt, and, therefore, many analysts believe that public sector deficits are unsustainable over the long-term. See also: Surplus.
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Martin Beck, senior economic adviser to the EY ITEM Club, said: "Today's figures mean that the public sector deficit has now fallen in each month of 2015 with another month of strong growth in tax receipts boosting the UK's fiscal position.
During their fifth review, the international lenders predicted a public sector deficit in 2014 of 4.
This is because the Public Sector deficit remains persistently high which will impact on welfare and other services.
The government's fiscal targets for 2014 envisage a further decline in the overall public sector deficit to 4.
The government s program provides measures to lower the consolidated public sector deficit to 4.
Due to the restrictive policies of expenditure management, it is estimated that the public sector deficit from 1.
This will make it difficult for the government to reduce the public sector deficit to 5.
Some countries, those with the smallest public sector deficit, would potentially see a slight increase in interest rates in the short term, but most would see a reduction.
The pension reform is part of the 2012 budget plan to reduce Belgium's public sector deficit to below the EU limit of 3 percent of gross domestic product next year and to reassure investors that Belgium has its finances under control.
The coalition Government's determination to reverse the public sector deficit within four years has led to deep and wide ranging cuts in government funding across all sectors which is having an inevitable impact.
But such a step will have "negative implications" for the public sector deficit.
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