Proxy Directive


Also found in: Medical.

Proxy Directive

A legal document giving an assignee the ability to make medical decisions on behalf of the assignor in the event of the assignor's mental or physical incapacity. A proxy directive is made while the assignor is still competent, and comes into effect at incapacity. A proxy directive gives far-reaching powers; for example, the form for a proxy directive in the state of New Jersey states allows the assignee the ability to "provide, withhold or withdraw life-sustaining measures" from the assignor. It is important to note that a proxy directive does not allow the assignee access to the assignor's finances, nor obliges the assignee to pay for any treatment. See also: Power of attorney.
References in periodicals archive ?
Proxy directive (Power of Attorney): written document that legally appoints someone to make decisions regarding property, financial affairs and/or personal care.
If the patient does not have a court-appointed guardian and has a valid proxy directive, the proxy will be the patient's surrogate decision-maker as established by the directive.
A durable power of attorney for health care is the most common type of proxy directive.
For all participants, dependent measures included attitudes toward end-of-life planning, comfort with end-of-life planning, knowledge about the health care proxy directive, and knowledge about the role of the agent.
18] A living will does not appoint a person to make the decision in place of the incapacitated patient as would a proxy directive.
The proxy directive, generally a Durable Power of Attorney for Health Care (DPAHC), allows for the designation of a surrogate medical decision maker of the patient's choosing.