Prohibitionist

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Prohibitionist

A person who subscribes to the idea that the best way to reduce unwanted actions is to ban them. For example, a prohibitionist may believe that the best way to end smoking is to forbid the possession or sale of tobacco. The effectiveness of prohibitionism is highly controversial.
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Over time, the objective of the temperance movement changed from a reduction in drinking to the outright prohibition of alcohol.
Dunnett points out, "Just as prohibition of alcohol caused a huge groundswell of illegal activity, so goes Internet gambling.
Regulation of American morals by means of legislation proved a failure, most notably with the prohibition of alcohol, and California and nine other states permitted racing with betting in 1933 during the Great Depression, when they needed extra revenue.
No politician or policeman would be nuts enough to call for the prohibition of alcohol.
Prohibition of alcohol did not work in the US in the 1920s and prohibition of drugs does not work in the countries which have signed up to the UN Convention.
In response to your article on Tesco and Asda's plans to address alcohol problems, if policy were determined by responding to headlines alone, the prohibition of alcohol would surely be on its way ('Supermarkets try to avoid ending up in the drink', The Grocer, 1 March, p30).
Spinelli (director of communications, Overseas Private Investment Corporation) examines the impact of the American prohibition of alcohol on Anglo-American diplomacy.
But pause a moment and think of the damage, crime and misery that the prohibition of alcohol caused in the USA.
It fought for social reforms, including the prohibition of alcohol, prostitution, child marriages, foot binding in China, the Japanese geisha system, and the sale of opium.
In fact, many writers have theorized that the global coffee craze might never have caught on had it not been for Islam's prohibition of alcohol, which led Muslims to turn to something else that was both psychoactive and a social glue.