Right to Privacy

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Right to Privacy

The right not to be violated without one's consent. For example, the right to privacy includes the right to be secure in one's own person or home. The right to privacy in guaranteed in many jurisdictions. Other jurisdictions that do not explicitly provide a right to privacy may provide some protections. For example, a government may prohibit searches in a private area without a warrant.
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In contrast to the United States, a general common law privacy right has never been recognized or enforced by the courts.
The Family Education Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) clearly establishes that parents control the privacy rights of students under the age of 18.
They say the states are the public policy laboratories for the nation," says the Privacy Rights Clearinghouse's Givens.
Courts have not extended any constitutionally based privacy right to people who are required to prove their identity with a fingerprint, although the government may have to show that it has a reasonable public purpose for taking a fingerprint.
David Straite, one of the attorneys leading the action, noted "this latest revelation of corporate America's brazen disregard for the digital privacy rights of its customers is yet another example of the escalating erosion of liberty in this country.
But, just as speech rights don't include the right to stampede a crowd by yelling fire in a crowded theater, privacy rights don't imply the removal of consent laws or laws protecting a spouse victimized by adultery.
Verizon has appealed the ruling, saying that the disclosure would violate the privacy rights of customers.
Please note: The article on privacy rights, scheduled for this issue, will appear in the spring.
Patient Privacy Rights and Georgetown University Law Center's O'Neill Institute for National and Global Health Law Open Event in Washington
Beyond that, releasing the tape serves no legitimate purpose that would outweigh the privacy rights of the crew.
A privacy rights advocacy group has asked the Federal Trade Commission to investigate whether Web sites advertising investigative services capable of digging up personal information such as phone call records are violating federal laws.