Right to Privacy

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Right to Privacy

The right not to be violated without one's consent. For example, the right to privacy includes the right to be secure in one's own person or home. The right to privacy in guaranteed in many jurisdictions. Other jurisdictions that do not explicitly provide a right to privacy may provide some protections. For example, a government may prohibit searches in a private area without a warrant.
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In any event, privacy rights would not confer immunity from the law.
However, even in a case such as this, an employee privacy right that trumps all other considerations is by no means assured.
26] With safeguards in place to protect the legal and privacy rights of citizens, organizations can use biometric systems with the cooperation of the public.
Following debate on the use of closed-circuit security cameras in Iran, Majlis Deputy Kazem Jalali warned that the program may violate privacy rights and said any use of security cameras must be within existing privacy guidelines.
The ruling is hailed by supporters as a major step forward for privacy rights in electronic communications.
Alternately funny and thoughtful, the novel also inspects family dynamics, the entertainment industry, and the privacy rights of public figures.
Students should be concerned because privacy rights would be infringed upon and there is no option to opt out of the program," says Jasmine Harris, legislative director of USSA.
According to the court, the BFOQ materially advanced the security of the prison, safety of inmates, and protection of privacy rights of inmates, and reasonable alternatives to the plan were not identified.
Initiated by the Privacy Rights Clearinghouse, a nonprofit group based in San Diego, the suit charges that Albertsons' Sav-on Drugs, Osco Drug and Jewel-Osco divisions sifted patient data to identify prospects for promotional letters or phone calls that encourage customers to renew prescriptions of, in some cases, consider converting to other medications.
The Humanist has a long tradition of arguing for privacy rights, so this article is sure to become controversial among readers.
When the privacy rights of individuals are pitted against corporations and governmental agencies that want unfettered access to the most valuable personal information that exists, eternal vigilance is the only effective response.