Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Acronyms, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.


Used in the context of general equities. As a verb execute a trade, evidenced by its printing on the ticker tape. As a noun, a trade.


1. Informal; to execute an order by making a trade.

2. Informal; a trade.

In both cases, the term is most applicable when the trade appears on a ticker tape or is otherwise publicly recorded.


The appearance of securities transactions on the composite tape.
References in classic literature ?
I bought 'em so I could print a bit of a letter to mother of a Sunday.
For I found beneath that pretty print such a heart as seldom beats beneath your satin, warm and wild as a bird's.
For a good many years, during the period in which our author remained in seclusion, much that appeared in print in America concerning Melville came from the pen of Mr.
No," replied he; "but I am too lazy to write, and when I have a verse in my head, I print it immediately.
There is as much difference to my eyes between the leaded bourgeois type of a Times article and the slovenly print of an evening half-penny paper as there could be between your negro and your Esquimau.
I think I'll do an article for one of the reviews, and then I can just print it afterwards as a preface.
At any rate, I let them alone for the time, and I did not meddle with a volume of Shakespeare, in green cloth and cruelly fine print, which overawed me in like manner with its wood-cuts.
very inconsiderately), that I did not print my books myself, and this lowered me in the eyes of David, for it was for the printing he had admired me and boasted of me in the Gardens.
He abstained from interfering with me and my studies, until it was reported in our society, that in the sixth print of my series, Gentleman Jones, highly caricatured, was to form one of the principal figures.
Their policy is to print nothing that is a vital menace to the established.
He was an English wool merchant who had gone to live in Bruges, but he was very fond of books, and after a time he gave up his wool business, came back to England, and began to write and print books.
One was of snuffy colored gingham which Marilla had been tempted to buy from a peddler the preceding summer because it looked so serviceable; one was of black-and-white checkered sateen which she had picked up at a bargain counter in the winter; and one was a stiff print of an ugly blue shade which she had purchased that week at a Carmody store.