Market correction

(redirected from Price Corrections)

Market correction

A relatively short-term drop in stock market prices, generally viewed as bringing overpriced stocks back to a level closer to companies' actual values.

Market Correction

A drop in the price of a security when that security has been overbought and therefore overpriced. Market corrections are usually short-term and are necessary for the stability of the security.
References in periodicals archive ?
These rooms are expected to play a role in price corrections.
As we foresaw in the past quarter, the primary markets of Dubai and Abu Dhabi underwent price corrections in Q2 [2015] that will most probably result in moderate upward market movements throughout the rest of the year," Masood Al Awar, CEO of Tasweek said.
This year seems to [suggest] a stable growth period with property sales picking up in the second-half, and with price corrections in pockets.
Just like agriculture, energy is a commodity and we will continue to see ups and downs and price corrections.
Heightened inflation, property price corrections and possible interest-rate hikes could exert pressure on the quality of RAM's much-discussed household loans.
Bin Mejren said "investors continue to capitalise on opportunities that have risen as a result of price corrections witnessed in the market over the past two years".
But the oil marketing companies (OMCs) have authorised to make price corrections from time to time.
The impact is likely to come from policy responses to high inflation that could cause steep property price corrections and pressure banks' profitability.
However, experts believe that price corrections might not be possible in near future.
Citing its own research, the Swiss daily reportedly said that the departures of David Blumer, former chief executive of asset management, and global securities chief Michael Ryan 'are a signal that Credit Suisse must undertake price corrections and that a further writedown of billions is imminent.
I think they'll have price corrections--short price corrections.
Markets with valuation premiums above 30 percent were deemed at risk for price corrections based on the typical degree of overvaluation that preceded the 63 known local market price declines observed since 1985.