prenuptial agreement

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Prenuptial Agreement

A legal and binding agreement that a couple enters prior to their marriage. Prenuptial agreements are commonly associated with the division of assets in the event of a divorce later in life, but they may also include other details such as how assets are distributed in the event of the death of a spouse. Prenuptial agreements are somewhat controversial as some see them as providing an expectation of divorce; they are designed, however, to reduce financial uncertainty in a marriage.

prenuptial agreement

A written agreement by a couple who plan to marry in which financial matters, including rights following divorce or the death of one spouse, are detailed.
References in periodicals archive ?
Thankfully, the Law Commission is now considering proposals to make prenuptial contracts legally binding, putting an end to ever-increasing goldmine divorce settlements, like the British record of pounds 100m signalled for the wife of Russian oligarch Boris Berezovsky.
Pre-partnership agreements, like prenuptial contracts for heterosexuals, will not be legally binding but could be taken into consideration by the courts if a civil partnership breaks down.
There are measures you can take, however, to safeguard your financial future if you are living with your partner, one being to make a so-called ``living together agreement'' The forms - similar to the prenuptial contracts much loved by Hollywood stars like Michael Douglas and Catherine Zeta Jones - are backed by the Government, and can be downloaded from the advicenow.
There are marriages with prenuptial contracts so coldly detailed even the justice of the peace blanches.
Then there are pathetic prenuptial contracts between drunken couples: You don't get my fishing pole no matter what happens.
She recommends that the federal government intervenes to coerce couples to write prenuptial contracts and to make divorce laws more consistent across state lines.
Buyer beware" might not be the most romantic advice, but it makes good business sense in the harsh sellers' market of the computer world, where vendors' sales pitches often end up as no more than vapor vows, and where consumers have no prenuptial contracts to protect them.