Pregnancy Discrimination Act

(redirected from Pregnancy Discrimination Act of 1978)
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Pregnancy Discrimination Act

Legislation in the United States, passed in 1978, requiring companies with 15 or more employees to treat pregnant women the same as all other employees. That is, employers cannot fire or refuse to give hours to a woman on account of pregnancy, childbirth or a similar condition.
References in periodicals archive ?
This Article fills that void by analyzing the legal and political debates that resulted in the passage of the Pregnancy Discrimination Act of 1978 ("PDA").
Congress passed the Pregnancy Discrimination Act of 1978 (PDA) with a specific purpose in mind--to override the Supreme Court's refusal in a 1976 case to see pregnancy discrimination as a form of sex discrimination under Title VII.
While the Pregnancy Discrimination Act of 1978 and Equal Employment Opportunity Commission prohibit discrimination against expectant mothers or discrimination on the basis of gender, Clark said that employers can still find ways to replace a mother on maternity leave.
Indeed, it took enactment of a federal law--the Pregnancy Discrimination Act of 1978, which requires all but the smallest employers' health plans to cover pregnancy-related care--to change the situation.
In response to the Gilbert decision, Congress amended Title VII by passing the Pregnancy Discrimination Act of 1978.
rejected by Congress in the Pregnancy Discrimination Act of 1978 (PDA).
Both the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission and a federal court have held that it is unlawful sex discrimination in the workplace under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, and specifically the Pregnancy Discrimination Act of 1978, to exclude contraception from an employee health insurance plan when the plan covers other prescriptions.
In addition to the $220,000 judgment, Wal-Mart agreed to engage in comprehensive training concerning the Pregnancy Discrimination Act of 1978.
The Pregnancy Discrimination Act of 1978 - An amendment to Title VII of the Civil Rights Act.
The EEOC said denial of contraceptive coverage violates the Pregnancy Discrimination Act of 1978, which prohibited discrimination against women based on the "whole range of matters concerning the childbearing process.
The commission said denial of contraception coverage violates the Pregnancy Discrimination Act of 1978, which requires equal treatment of women "affected by pregnancy, childbirth or related medical conditions" in all aspects of employment, including fringe benefits.
The Pregnancy Discrimination Act of 1978 specifically prohibits discrimination because of pregnancy; employers can not refuse to employ a woman in this condition.