Pregnancy Discrimination Act


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Pregnancy Discrimination Act

Legislation in the United States, passed in 1978, requiring companies with 15 or more employees to treat pregnant women the same as all other employees. That is, employers cannot fire or refuse to give hours to a woman on account of pregnancy, childbirth or a similar condition.
References in periodicals archive ?
Following the decisions in Gilbert and Satty, Congress passed an amendment to Title VII known as the Pregnancy Discrimination Act, which provided a definition of discrimination "because of' or "based on sex" that included discrimination "because of or on the basis of pregnancy, childbirth or related medical conditions" and required that "women affected by pregnancy, childbirth or related medical conditions shall be treated the same for all employment-related purposes .
th] anniversary of the Pregnancy Discrimination Act, there are still constant reminders of discrimination in the workplace based on pregnancy and family status.
Wade Set the Precedent": Anti-Abortion Advocacy for the Pregnancy Discrimination Act B.
THE EARLY PROMISE OF THE PREGNANCY DISCRIMINATION ACT
After a history and overview, chapters are organized by specific legislation: Title VII of the Civil Rights Act; the Americans with Disabilities Act; the Age Discrimination in Employment Act; the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act of 2008; the Pregnancy Discrimination Act of 1978; and the Equal Pay Act.
The Pregnancy Discrimination Act (PDA), enacted in October 1978, outlaws employment discrimination on the basis of pregnancy, childbirth, or related medical conditions.
A woman who missed work to have an abortion is protected under the Pregnancy Discrimination Act (PDA), the Third Circuit recently ruled in a case of first impression.
Indeed, it took enactment of a federal law--the Pregnancy Discrimination Act of 1978, which requires all but the smallest employers' health plans to cover pregnancy-related care--to change the situation.
One is the Pregnancy Discrimination Act (PDA), which is an amendment to Title VII of the Civil Rights Act.
In response to the Gilbert decision, Congress amended Title VII by passing the Pregnancy Discrimination Act of 1978.
In particular, the reasoning of existing case law on Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (59) as amended by the Pregnancy Discrimination Act (PDA) (60) is compelling and applicable to the situation of pharmacy refusal.
Despite legislation designed to promote equality for women and mothers in the workplace, including Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 ("Title VII"), the Pregnancy Discrimination Act (the "PDA"), and the Family and Medical Leave Act (the "FMLA"), discrimination persists.