Precautionary motive

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Precautionary motive

A desire to hold cash in order to be able to deal effectively with unexpected events that require cash outlay.

Precautionary Motive

The desire to keep extra money in case an unforeseen situation requires a capital outlay. For example, one may wish to save extra money to pay for medical bills in case of an accident. According to John Maynard Keynes, people keep savings accounts, as well as some stocks and commodities, with a precautionary motive in order to cover unexpected events. See also: Precautionary demand (for money).
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Nor was there wanting still another precautionary motive more related to Ahab personally.
These effects and precautionary motives may have been amplified by financial under-development, as reflected in constraints on borrowing against future income and low returns on financial assets.
He places sole responsibility for China's soaring saving rate on precautionary motives.
The first two measures will directly boost consumption, and the third will indirectly help to raise consumption by allaying the widespread precautionary motives that lead to excessively high household and business savings.
However, households will save much more because of sharp declines in housing wealth, credit constraints and precautionary motives at a time of rising unemployment: the saving ratio will rise from 1.
Nevertheless, when precautionary motives are weak, decisions depend mostly on the mean, and errors in approximating the tails don't matter much.
If we consider two individuals, with one more risk averse than the other, we need to compare the intensities of their precautionary motives, in addition to their measures of risk aversion, before we can determine who buys more insurance coverage in the presence of the state dependent background risk.
Bernanke noted in his speech, ''with consumer credit not readily available and precautionary motives for saving remaining strong,'' China's domestic consumption was also restrained.
However, we note that higher net wealth also implies less permanent income variability, so that the importance of net wealth could point to precautionary motives just as easily as to liquidity constraints.
In survey data, consumers report precautionary motives as an important impetus for saving.
The extra yuan created from foreign exchange intervention just did not filter through to Chinese consumption, but instead went to satisfy the desire to hold yuan (for precautionary motives under the broken social safety net) and yuan assets (for investment purposes to maximize returns under financial liberalization).
Since a large proportion of aggregate wealth is held by the richest few percent of households, these estimates very likely overstate the proportion of aggregate wealth that can be attributed to precautionary motives.