Poverty Line


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.

Poverty Line

The minimum yearly income that a person or family needs in order to provide for basic needs. Frequently, a government agency sets the poverty line for a jurisdiction; this line may bear only a rough relationship to one's actual poverty. However, a poverty line is often used to determine eligibility for welfare and other benefit programs.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Although Turkey is a middle-income country that has experienced significant growth over the past decade, millions live under the poverty line and the country is among the worst of the Organization for Cooperation and Economic Development (OECD) member states regarding income inequality.
Meanwhile, the number of children living between the upper and lower poverty lines was approximately 7.
The ratio of children living under the poverty line rose to 17 percent in 2013 from 15.
The 2014 national poverty report also revealed that about 40 percent of Australians living on social security benefits fall below the poverty line.
Plus the bill included a cost of living increase, to permanently keep the minimum wage above the federal poverty line.
4 billion people lived on less than US $2 a day in 2010, the average poverty line in developing countries and another common measurement of deep deprivation.
Yet, in practice, the World Bank's 'dollar-a-day' international poverty line preserves invariance in the space of real incomes, while India's official poverty lines preserve invariance in the space of commodity bundles.
A detailed analysis of households below the poverty line in 2012 will be announced at the CoP Summit on September 28.
SHOCK REPORT: The Child Poverty Action Group says nearly 17,000 Coventry children are living below the poverty line
Aside from the working poor, an additional 215 million workers worldwide slipped below the poverty line in 2008-2009, owing to the Great Recession.
And one of the seldom discussed issues facing those on the poverty line is their vulnerability to loan sharks.
Prof Shlomo Mor Yosef, head of National Insurance Institute, has said that the Treasury's economic plans would be disastrous for families living below the poverty line.

Full browser ?