Depression

(redirected from Postnatal depression)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Depression

Period when excess aggregate supply overwhelms aggregate demand, resulting in falling prices, unemployment problems, and economic contraction.

Depression

A particularly long and/or deep recession. While there is no technical definition of a depression, conventionally it is defined as a period featuring severe declines in productivity and investment and particularly high unemployment. During the Great Depression, for example, GDP in the United States dropped 12% between 1929 and 1930 and a further 16% the following year. Likewise, unemployment rose to more than 25% nationwide and higher in some places.

Depression.

A depression is a severe and prolonged downturn in the economy. Prices fall, reducing purchasing power. There tends to be high unemployment, lower productivity, shrinking wages, and general economic pessimism.

Since the Great Depression following the stock market crash of 1929, the governments and central banks of industrialized countries have carefully monitored their economies. They adjust their economic policies to try to prevent another financial crisis of this magnitude.

depression

see BUSINESS CYCLE.

depression

a phase of the BUSINESS CYCLE characterized by a severe decline (slump) in the level of economic activity (ACTUAL GROSS NATIONAL PRODUCT). Real output and INVESTMENT are at very low levels and there is a high rate of UNEMPLOYMENT. A depression is caused mainly by a fall in AGGREGATE DEMAND and can be reversed provided that the authorities evoke expansionary FISCAL POLICY and MONETARY POLICY. See DEFLATIONARY GAP, DEMAND MANAGEMENT.
References in periodicals archive ?
At a time where cuts are being made across services we want to emphasise the importance of investing in breastfeeding as enabling more mothers to breastfeed without diffi-culty may both improve breastfeeding rates and lower rates of postnatal depression, which translates into saving money long-term for the NHS.
A meta-analysis reported postnatal depression in about 10 per cent of fathers after birth (Paulson and Bazemore, 2010).
In addition, low levels of social support, particularly partner support and availability of people to depend on during the pregnancy and early postpartum, and a woman's relationship with her own parents were found to be significant factors for both antenatal and postnatal depression.
Postnatal depression is a recognised and treatable condition, which affects approximately one in five mothers and one in 10 fathers.
Postnatal depression was assessed using a simple early postnatal depression tool described by Whooley et al.
Understanding the value of getting help, Natasha is backing a bid to secure funding for Merseyside's only service that is specifically for women with postnatal depression (PND).
While one personal account cannot cover the whole range of individual symptoms and experiences, a brief but thorough final chapter with information about types of postnatal depression and treatment options, along with contacts, references and further reading options provides a very useful addition to this valuable book.
The studies "add to the growing evidence that postnatal depression can be effectively treated and possibly prevented," Dr.
Postnatal depression in mothers affects the quality of maternal care and can lead to disturbances in children's social, behavioural, cognitive and physical development.
Medical researchers think regular pram pushing could combat the worst symptoms of postnatal depression, which affects more than one in ten women.
Maternal depression was found in 23% of the 218 women surveyed by telephone with the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS of 10 or above) in San Mateo County, Calif.
Postnatal depression and sexual health after childbirth, Obstetrics & Gynecology, 2003, 102(6): 1318-1325.