population

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Related to Population size: population growth, Sample size

population

  1. the total number of people resident in a country at a particular point in time. The UK, for example, had a population of 59 million people in 2004. The size of the population is determined by past and present birth and death rates, together with net migration trends – the number of people leaving the country to live abroad (emigration) compared with the number entering the country to take up residence (immigration). The UK birth rate is currently 11 births per 1000 of the population per annum and the death rate 10 per 1000 of the population per annum. In most advanced countries, both birth and death rates have declined over the long run because of rising living standards and improved medical care; this has produced slow-growing, ageing populations.

    The total size of the population and its composition in terms of proportion of males to females and age-group distributions, combined with various SOCIOECONOMIC factors influencing buying characteristics, are important to businesses in assessing the market potential for their products.

  2. all possible observations of a certain phenomenon in statistical analysis, for example incomes of all people resident in a country. Where it is too time-consuming and expensive to record all possible observations it is necessary to take a SAMPLE, for example the incomes of 1000 citizens, and generalize about the incomes of all citizens from this sample. See STATISTICAL INFERENCE.
Populationclick for a larger image
Fig. 144 Population. The UK birth and death rates, measured in numbers per 1,000 of the population, from 1740 to 2004.

population

the total number of people resident in a country. The size of the population is determined by past and present BIRTH RATES and DEATH RATES as well as MIGRATION trends. In most advanced industrial countries, both birth and death rates have declined over the long run (see DEMOGRAPHIC TRANSITION), which has produced slow-growing populations. The size and growth of a country's population determine the size of the LABOUR FORCE that is available to produce output, a country's GROSS NATIONAL PRODUCT divided by its population providing a measure of the country's general prosperity (see INCOME PER HEAD). In 2004 the UK's population was 59 million (see Fig. 144 ). By comparison, the population of Germany was 82 million, the USA 288 million, Japan 127 million, India 1,048 million and China 1,281 million.
References in periodicals archive ?
This could also explain why within different human societies, war deaths were found to increase in sync with increasing population sizes.
The data from CSIROs close-kin DNA matching study of SBT has shown that the population size of this highly prized fish is greater than previously thought.
9) was simulated with finite base population size which had 20, 50, 100, 200, 500, 1000 and 2000; for each generation, the sex ratio was arranged into 1: 1 and 1: 2 (male: female) using equaled family size conservation.
Genetic responses for background traits under different population sizes:The genetic responses for two background traits under different population sizes by MBLUP background selection were given in figure 8: for the second background trait, whether in backcross phase or in intercross phase, the genetic responses obtained under population size 1000 is higher than that obtained under population size 500.
The classical, widely used approach to estimating population density from capture-recapture data is to divide the estimated population size by an estimated (calculated) effective trapping area (e.
On the contrary, the population size decreased in Ukraine by 3.
These data offer HIV prevention program planners some much-needed precision in key population size estimates," commented Population Council researcher Jerry Okal.
The new method could revolutionise how whale population size is estimated.
This technique proved to be a convenient tool for monitoring locomotor rhythm, use of space, dispersal, growth, and estimation of population size of several crayfish species (Acosta & Perry, 2000; Gherardi et al.
Not long after restoration efforts were initiated using wild turkeys, the Georgia Department of Natural Resources (DNR) started two independent annual turkey surveys in 1979, which coincided with Eberhardt's (2) recommendation that both reproduction and population size be estimated independently.

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