Poop

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Poop

(Very) informal; a person with inside information. Poops generally are not allowed to make any trades based on this information.
References in periodicals archive ?
That image, rest assured, comes straight from the movie, specifically a segment in which a miniature diorama is desecrated by some poopy projectiles courtesy of one of Knoxville's fellow pranksters.
it [EC] seemed to me a lot less work (and more enjoyable) than changing a baby and washing wet or poopy diapers for years .
She's appeared in two of the summer's biggest teen movies - Angus, Thongs and Perfect Snogging and Wild Child, in which she plays bitchy schoolgirl Kate who picks on American newcomer Poopy, played by Emma Roberts.
The y and ie endings are suffixes that toddlers and morns add to the ends of words: poopy, binky, icky, and dolly.
The reason we don't like this space between 65,000 feet and 300 kilometers is that it takes a large ungainly poopy bag sort of thing that nobody likes to deal with on the ground, inflate it, and get it up there to do its work.
For the really poopy ones, there's Psalm 8: "What are we that you should keep us in mind; we are mortal, yet you care for us.
I have even been known to take photographs of spectacular nappy fillings - although, there is a commercial motivation for that: the reare web sites out there that pay top dollar for pictures of poopy nappies.
Other -- Crown Products' Poopy Doo and Scoopy Doo disposable bags.
The author began the article with a graphic description of what "adults" face in raising children: "spit-up stains, poopy diapers, homework assignments, soccer games .
Each subject went through the entire setup twice, once wearing the Standard Flight Equipment (SFE) with CE and once wearing the SFE without CE (no poopy suits in either condition).
art; we had to deal with the fact that great art often comes out of a politically poopy reality.
From the trying postpartum times and poopy diapers to picking a pediatrician and acknowledging you are no longer the person you were before the baby, Klein covers the unmentionables.