Zionism

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Zionism

The political view that Jews have a right to national homeland in Palestine roughly corresponding to the borders of Biblical Israel. Zionism emerged as a nationalist movement in 19th-century Europe as secular and assimilated Jews did not find wide acceptance in European society. Many, though not all, early Zionists were socialists; this led to the establishment of communal farms in Palestine. Religious Zionism was initially a minor part of the movement, but has grown in importance since the 1960s. After the establishment of the States of Israel in 1948, the Zionist movement has concentrated on maintaining or expanding Israel's borders and/or influence. Proponents of Zionism believe a Jewish homeland is the only place Jews can be perfectly safe from persecution, while critics contend that Palestinian Arabs have been displaced and discriminated against since the early 20th century.
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The Jewish Socialist Bund and, for that matter, Simon Dubnov's dream of Jewish autonomy in multi-ethnic states, were creations of the Diaspora at the end of the nineteenth century, in the very years when political Zionism was created.
Whereas Herzl's political Zionism was a radical change from his previous assimilationist outlook ("only anti, Semitism has made Jews of us:' he wrote in 1895), Ahad Ha'ams cultural Zionism was a direct consequence of his Jewish heritage.
36) As Michael Prior notes, "There was little debate within political Zionism on the right of Jews to go to an already inhabited Palestine.
A balanced examination of Arendt's views would suggest that she expressed considerable ambivalence regarding Jewish statehood in the years leading up to the creation of the State of Israel, and a particular hostility to the right-wing or Revisionist variant of political Zionism.
The historical relationship between these Christian plans and the development of political Zionism by Theodor Herzl and other Jewish thinkers remains an open question.
However, Herzl and political Zionism were not capable to concretize the modes of conquest.
Theodor Herzl, founder of modern political Zionism, articulated these objectives in his 1895 diary.
Modern political Zionism, incapable of acknowledging its injustices and blind to its faults, thoroughly ridicules the sublime human values of Judaism.
Herzl, the founder of Political Zionism, advocated the establishment of an independent Jewish State backed by the major Western powers.
Two years after receiving ordination from the Hebrew Union College (HUC) in 1914, Lazaron informed the Federation of American Zionists that he eschewed political Zionism in favor of encouraging settlement in Palestine and furthering Jewish life there.
In relation to political Zionism, the establishment of the State of Israel added significance to the original publication of this biography two years later.
Modern political Zionism, which otherwise rejects the Christian Bible, adopted the untested story of "Jewish exile" to establish mythical linkage between European Jews and the Middle East.