Nationalism

(redirected from Polish nationalism)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to Polish nationalism: German nationalism

Nationalism

The philosophy in which one promotes the interests of one's own country or ethnic group over others. For example, nationalism may advocate secession of a region to form a new country in which one's own ethnic group predominates. What qualifies as a "nation" in nationalist terms is a matter of some disagreement.
References in periodicals archive ?
Although Poles only made up 57 per cent of Upper Silesia's population by 1910, in absolute terms more Poles lived in the region than even in Poznari, the heartland of Polish nationalism in the Kaiserreich.
62) This antagonistic strategy--also illustrated by the Populists' co-operation and eventual merger with Roman Dmowski's separatist National Democrats--drew the ire of a Center press that feared the challenge posed by Polish nationalism to the Catholic consensus in Upper Silesia.
The triumph of Polish nationalism over all other ideological and political competitors, already established in the early twentieth century, would nor only have a major impact on the formulation of the "woman question" in public discourse, but also on its proposed practical "resolutions.
Silesia has been contested by German, Czech, and Polish nationalism since the second half of the 19th century, says Kamusella (Opole U.
Of the texturally complex tone poem Rapsodia litewska (Lithuanian Rhapsody) he argues that its novel use of melodic folk material bears no relation to post-Chopin Polish nationalism and concludes: "That Karlowicz was able to bypass the moribund nationalism of his countrymen to produce this authentic, 'true' likeness of his homeland, is proof enough of the strength of his own artistic personality, while the very nonconformity of the Lithuanian Rhapsody within his own oeuvre is indicative of the vitality of his creative gift" (p.
Dobrzynski's Polish nationalism also found expression in two sacred choral works that Smialek describes as among his "most expressive scores" (pp.