Plutocrat

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Plutocrat

A person with real or perceived political authority due to his/her vast wealth. For example, a person who donates vast sums to candidates of all major parties in order to have influence no matter who wins may be called a plutocrat. The term is highly derogatory.
References in periodicals archive ?
This is a lesson for all countries contemplating corporate tax breaks - even those without the misfortune of being led by a callow, craven plutocrat.
Increasing inequality as a key driver of this shift: more than ever before, contemporary plutocrats fund intellectuals and idea factories that generate arguments that align with their own.
John D Rockefeller and Andrew Carnegie, plutocrats of the Gilded Age, used their money against their enemies, to be sure, enemies that included newspapers and magazines that disagreed with them for all sorts of reasons.
That declaration and the threat of possible action by the IRS did dampen the enthusiasm for such deals, but still left many deals intact, leaving the plutocrats with the benefit of lower taxes.
West of the Brookings Institution, the book points out that plutocrats worldwide not only "own" candidates but "buy" political office--witness Bidzina Ivanishvili in Georgia, Serge Dassault in France or, most famously, Silvio Berlusconi in Italy.
Here, political parties, almost from one to all, have been reduced into family fiefdoms by a few plutocrats.
It amazes me what lengths these plutocrats will go to squeeze the working man and woman.
Labor journalist Pizzigati reviews the history of the 20th century in order to remind us that such sentiments might have seemed equally valid at the start of the that century, but that a broad group of activists, union organizers, political coalitions, and others fought a long-running battle to curtail the privileges of the plutocrats and to create the conditions for an unprecedented expansion of the middle class.
In fact, as Thai Jones recounts in More Powerful Than Dynamite: Radicals, Plutocrats, Progressives, and New York's Year of Anarchy (Walker), many journalists found him hard to take.
And because money talks, this softness - call it the pathos of the plutocrats - has become a major factor in America's political life.
The plutocrats are so vital to us - we couldn't possibly do without them.
Stated concerns by those who serve the plutocrats over unemployment are fictional whether deliberate or by default.