pluralism

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pluralism

a diffusion of power and interests in a society or ORGANIZATION, such that there is a plurality of interest groups. Those who subscribe to pluralism argue that there will inevitably be differences between individuals or groups in any complex social institution over, for instance, the distribution of rewards.

Pluralists claim that it is better to accept these differences than to suppress them, because once they are brought into the open it is possible to find mechanisms for resolving potential conflict to the benefit of all. In INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS the pluralist frame of reference is held by those who believe that the interests of management and workers will inevitably differ on occasions, for example over the size of an annual pay increase. They argue that it is better to accept that TRADE UNIONS are the legitimate expressions of employee interests rather than to refuse recognition on the grounds that employer-employee interests are identical. If the latter policy is adopted CONFLICT may break out without warning and with no acceptable means of resolving it. If, on the other hand, unions are recognized then management and unions can work together to devise procedures (for example GRIEVANCE PROCEDURES) that will prevent differences of interest from developing into open conflict and provide a means of resolving conflict if it should occur. See MANAGEMENT STYLE.

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From a postmodern pluralistic perspective, these three components are important and must be supported by the profession.
11) For a full explanation of a de jure pluralistic perspective, see John Hick, An Interpretation of Religion, 2nd ed.
Before we go into some of the findings of such a re-reading, it is quite legitimate to raise a question about the whole enterprise of "re-reading" the Bible -- whether from a Latin American, feminist/womanist, minjung or pluralistic perspective.
Erdoy-an said in this message, "In Turkey, expressing different opinions and thoughts freely on the events of 1915 is the requirement of a pluralistic perspective as well as of a culture of democracy and modernity.
Expressing his discomfort with a pluralistic perspective throughout the book, the author insinuates--at times in almost polemical fashion--that only monotheism can protect individuals from the power-claims of others and, ultimately, that only monotheism can be a true guarantee of inalienable human rights (p.