White Noise

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White Noise

The audio equivalent of Brownian motion. Sounds that are unrelated and sound like a hiss. The video equivalent of white noise is "snow" in television reception.

Random Walk Theory

An investment philosophy holding that security prices are completely unpredictable, especially in the short term. Random walk theory states that both fundamental analysis and technical analysis are wastes of time, as securities behave randomly. Thus, the theory holds that it is impossible to outperform the market by choosing the "correct" securities; it is only possible to outperform the market by taking on additional risk. Critics of random walk theory contend that empirical evidence shows that security prices do indeed follow particular trends that can be predicted with a fair degree of accuracy. The theory originated in 1973 with the book, A Random Walk Down Wall Street. See also: Efficient markets theory.
References in periodicals archive ?
With babble noise, the mean durations over 61 subjects were 143, ms (SD 37 ms) and 349 ms (SD 76 ms), and correspondingly with pink noise, 130 ms (SD 32 ms) and 341 ms (SD 79 ms).
There's no shortage of catchy material on Pink Noise Test's just-released major label debut, ``Plasticized'' (Interscope), which boasts an industrial-strength undercurrent.
Usually, I can bring a speaker to its knees at somewhere above 108 dB/1M with pink noise or musical passages, but not the Studio100.
I monitored the direct electrical outputs by frequency using my ADC SS-525X analyzer and the Soundcraftsmen ITR-3292 test record band "Continuous All Band Pink Noise for General EQ Use".
One eminent designer came to audition the 1A rev of the design, and before we got to any music he put on a test CD and immediately said, "Boy, listen to that pink noise.
Deep bass was a little recessed, highs a little edgy, mid-bass smeared, and overall volume seemed low at any given pink noise SPL.
However, my experience has led me to believe that you can subjectively do the job just as well by using a pink noise source and adjusting things so that the left channels of the two amps sound identical and the right channels also sound identical.
As usual, this curve was generated by measuring both speakers reproducing uncorrelated pink noise while I slowly moved my measurement microphone over a 1 x 1 x 5 foot-wide area at roughly head height at the listening couch.
During the acoustic calibration process, the speakers will emit a series of pink noise and timing pulses that are received by the microphone and sent to a digital equalizer for final calibration of up to seven channels.
You quickly find out this is only theoretical, however, if you run mono pink noise through your system.
Howard Ferstler replies: I use uncorrelated pink noise generated from one of two sources: either the one-minute segment on the Delos Surround Spectacular test disc or else the somewhat longer track on the disc produced by the Boston Audio Society.
As with the curves in Part 1, the ones printed here are the best I could achieve by positioning the speakers at optimum locations in my main room and feeding them with uncorrelated (stereo) pink noise.