A. Philip Randolph

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A. Philip Randolph

A 20th-century American socialist and union organizer. He was particularly known for his role in the civil rights movement, protesting against discrimination against Black Americans in military contracts and other areas. In 1925, he organized the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters, the first major effort to unionize the Pullman Company, which was then a major employer of African Americans. He lived from 1889 to 1979.
References in periodicals archive ?
Philip Randolph is depicted as more calculating and tactical in his behaviour perhaps because, in his case, Lee had access to documents that show that in private he was perfectly willing to criticize the union leadership for "intentionally preventing blacks and Puerto Ricans from taking positions of leadership" (p.
Philip Randolph cancelled a threatened protest rally by Black workers in Washington, DC on the eve of US entry into World War II.
Philip Randolph, George Eliot, Augustine of Hippo and Samuel Johnson may or may not have been "saints" in a classic sense but they prove to be excellent models.
Philip Randolph helped the Pullman porters attempted to form a union for better pay and working conditions--an endeavor that would take them twelve years to accomplish (their union was the "Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters").
Philip Randolph is something of a household name, while folks like Anna Arnold Hedgeman and Pauli Murray are well-known among historical specialists.
Philip Randolph and the Ladies' Auxiliary to the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters, Nannie Helen Burroughs, Fannie Lou Hamer, Ella Jo Baker, George Schuyler and the Young Negroes' Co-operative League, the Nation of Islam, and the Black Panther Party.
Philip Randolph, and Martin Luther King, the Freedom Budget proposed the elimination of poverty in the United States, along with full employment, decent housing, and health care for all.
Philip Randolph and Bayard Rustin came into the room and spoke with Dr.
Philip Randolph Pullman Porter Museum (APRPPM) announced they have reestablished the museum's National Advisory Council.
Philip Randolph and Bayard Rustin started shopping the idea, the Urban League declined to support it, the NAACP refused to commit one way or another, and Martin Luther King and the Southern Christian Leadership Conference were too busy with other challenges to get engaged.
Philip Randolph during a mass meeting in Chicago that "we ought to throw 50,000 Negroes around the White House, bring them from all over the country, in jalopies, in trains, and any way they can get there .