Peso


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Peso

The name of several currencies. The word originated as the Spanish term for a large, silver coin common in international trade in the 16th century. It is currently the name of currencies in several former colonies of Spain, particularly in Latin America. See also: Mexican peso.
References in periodicals archive ?
It's like a tax on anybody who buys pesos with dollars," said Philip Peters, vice-president at the Lexington Institute.
For example, in the sugar industry, 1 million dollars in exports can now be exchanged for 12 million in pesos, instead of 1 million, and some of that money used to improve wages and the payments farmers receive for their cane.
Aunque la bioimpedancia aporta conocimientos mas exactos sobre la composicion hidrica corporal y la distribucion del agua en los pacientes de dialisis, el peso seco establecido por estimacion clinica sigue siendo de gran valor, ya que no existen diferencias significativas de este, respecto al estimado por la bioimpedancia posthemodialisis al menos en pacientes en situacion clinica estable.
Las variables independientes fueron frame score (pequeno y mediano) y raza (Brahman y Red Brahman) y las variables dependientes fueron peso al nacimiento, peso al destete, ganancia diaria de peso y peso ajustado a los 210 dias para frame score y ganancias diarias de peso y peso ajustado a los 210 dias para raza.
This represents a substantial alleviation in dollars in the exchange market, so there's less pressure to strengthen the peso," Finance Minister Juan Carlos Echeverry told reporters.
Peso credited part of his team's success to the pitching staff, led by right-hander Mitchell Goldman, who was 3-1.
Article 117 of the Mexican Constitution, however, prohibits state governments from obtaining financing from foreign entities and further prohibits such financing in anything but pesos in an effort to avoid over-indebtedness.
The Central Bank said earlier it forecasts the peso to settle in at the 53 to 53.
The International Monetary Fund (IMF) allowed the Philippines to expand its budget deficit this year from the original target of 40 billion pesos, equivalent to 1.
While the Mexican peso crisis has raised legitimate questions about Mexican economic policies before and during the events of December 1994 and January 1995, its propagation through international financial markets has also pointed to broader questions about the international institutional and financial environment.
example, the peso cost of maintaining insured values in compliance with the valuation clauses of the local policies (100 percent) increases dramactically.
Despite the fall of the Mexican peso and ensuing foreign investor apprehension, the Latin American hospitality industry continues to hold many investment opportunities for the savvy investor, according to the National Real Estate, Hospitality and Consulting Practice of KPMG Peat Marwick LLP.