Pension Shortfall

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Pension Shortfall

A situation in which there are insufficient funds in a defined benefit plan to cover the plan's obligations. A pension shortfall may occur when the investments into which the employer placed the funds do not perform as well as hoped, or perhaps when a disproportionate number of retirees live longer than expected. The company providing the pension is liable for the pension shortfall, meaning that it must find a way to make payments, even if it reduces the company's income.
References in periodicals archive ?
City officials in Texas faced several challenges in 2017, from pension shortfalls that threatened their budgets to lawmakers who increasingly got involved in local matters.
The panel also suggested using some of those new or freed-up funds to provide a financial sweetener to school districts, local governments and other public agencies that come up with ways to pay down their own individual pension shortfalls earlier than required.
Global Banking News-February 25, 2014--Insurance group wants more disclosure on pension shortfalls
This issue is especially relevant in Asia-Pacific where all markets are facing significant pension shortfalls.
In large part, pension shortfalls are a result of financial mismanagement, shortsighted decision making, unrealistic investment projections, and the 2008 market downturn, the report states.
It will also debate plans to develop old neighbourhoods within a government-proposed timeframe, as well as proposals to initiate a special government fund to meet pension shortfalls and another to support the elderly.
Mary Williams Walsh a business reporter for The New York Times, has been digging into the issues surrounding pension shortfalls in places like Detroit and Wisconsin.
The shift from silver surfer to silver entrepreneur comes amid concerns over pension shortfalls and fears over financial security.
The pension relief title of the act allows single-employer plans to elect to amortize over a longer period pension shortfalls caused by losses in asset value they experienced in 2008.
However, if they did this overnight, trustees would demand more cash to plug pension shortfalls because they could not expect investment returns on their assets to do as much of the work.
It is necessary to do something about the Royal Mail's pension shortfalls.
Across the FTSE, we would argue that the signs we are seeing now - actual incentive awards approaching maximum opportunity levels, pension shortfalls being replaced with cash payments, one-off incentives and companies testing private equity type models in a quoted environment - are early indicators that a sea change is about to happen.