Pell Grant

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Pell Grant

A grant that the federal government offers to students based on financial need. A Pell grant may be used to pay for education expenses (up to $5,500 in 2010-2011) for a first bachelor's degree. One must file a FAFSA to become eligible for a Pell grant.
References in periodicals archive ?
Around 22 percent to 24 percent of its students receive Pell Grants, says Thomas McWhorter, USC's dean of financial aid.
Last week, Secretary DeVos announced year-round Pell Grants will be available to students beginning July 1.
Chairman of the Appropriations Subcommittee on Labor, Health and Human Services, Education, and Related Agencies, today commended the Department of Educations announcement that year-round Pell Grants will be available to students beginning July 1.
Pell Grants have been a fixture of federal financial aid since the 1970s, helping millions of low-income students attend college annually.
This is particularly true on our campuses, where, on average, over half of our undergraduate students receive Federal Pell Grants.
For decades, the federal government has banned the use of Pell Grants funds for such rehabilitation efforts.
Pell Grants are awarded based on a complicated formula.
In this forum, Isabel Sawhill, co-director of the Center on Children and Families and the Budgeting for National Priorities Project at the Brookings Institution, calls for conditioning Pell Grants on both financial need and the likelihood of college completion.
The percent of low income students at local colleges varies widely, but most fall within the range expected for their type of institution, according to a review of Pell grants, a form of federal financial aid that goes mostly to low-income students.
by Jenna Ashley Robinson and Duke Cheston, brings together what is known about Pell grants to determine how well the program serves the students who receive them and the taxpayers who fund them.
House appropriators would make devastating structural changes to Pell Grant eligibility and would cut Pell Grants by $44 billion over 10 years, an estimated $40 billion coming through the denial of Pell grants for some of the most vulnerable students.
We have data from the federal Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System survey that tell us the percentage of a school's students on Pell Grants, which is a good measure of a school's commitment to educating lower-income kids.