Pay-to-play


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Pay-to-play

Attempts by municipal bond underwriting businesses to gain influence with political officials who decide which underwriters are awarded the municipality's business.

Pay-to-Play

A practice in which a politician encourages monetary contributions in exchange for benefits for an individual or company. Paying to play may involve outright bribery, but it usually refers to more subtle payments. For example, an insurance company may make large contributions to a politician re-election war chest and the politician may then be inclined to vote in the insurance company's interest. Paying to play is often in a legal gray area. See also: Campaign Finance, Campaign Finance Reform.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The practice, known as pay-to-play, is illegal under state and federal laws.
The MSRB needs to go back to the drawing board and come up with an alternative that addresses pay-to-play concerns while protecting First Amendment rights.
However, pay-to-play laws may derail even the best proposals.
CONFERENCE side Macclesfield Town yesterday cancelled their pay-to-play offer for a fan, saying it was an "error of judgement".
Pay-to-play programs are not new, but the dire economy is causing them to grow.
Pay-to-play contracting has long been an ethics issue in government.
on Tuesday for their role in what was called the City Hall pay-to-play scandal.
Pay-to-play fees help prevent the elimination of after-school sports and clubs.
Staffordshire firm Leisure Link Group - which has grown to become the country's largest pay-to-play machine management firm - has clinched an exclusive licensing agreement with Ecast of San Francisco to develop a new generation of entertainment terminals for the UK leisure market.
A previous SEC investigation into pay-to-play abuses in the municipal bond industry resulted in a new rule, G-37, developed by the Municipal Securities Rulemaking Board (MSRB) and approved by the SEC.
Over time, pay-to-play schemes seemed so numerous that some honest contractors stopped trying to do business with state government, driving up costs to taxpayers and making Illinoisans question the honesty and fairness of their state government.
But several of the biggest proposed changes, an outright ban on campaign donations and solicitation by lobbyists and a prohibition on donations from state contractors, a so-called pay-to-play ban already adopted in seven other states, was set aside by House leaders.