participation rate

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Participation Rate

The number of persons in an economy who are willing to work, and are either working or looking for work as a percentage of the total labor force. The participation rate is one way to measure an economy's employment rate. See also: Discouraged worker.

participation rate

see ACTIVITY RATE.
References in periodicals archive ?
Sheikh Khaled Arafat, a member of the Nasserist Al-Karama Party in North Sinai, told Daily News Egypt that voter participation rates have improved on Monday.
The paper notes first of all that the participation rates of Turkish educated women, according to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), are far below those of some developing countries.
The iceberg addressed here involves declining voluntary participation rates.
However, because participation rates have actually been falling for some demographic groups since well before the recession began, at times our analysis necessarily extends to earlier periods in order to properly frame more recent developments.
Many labor force participation studies during this period focused on the increasing participation rates of women.
The participation rates for foreign-born women and men have risen 2.
During the recent recession and recovery, for example, labor force participation has fallen sharply--and unlike unemployment rates, participation rates have shown little sign of recovery.
If your working age population isn't growing, you better be sure to have high labor force participation rates.
A PROJECT to increase participation rates in fencing and wheelchair fencing in Teesside has been given a boost.
The present study analyzes four consecutive years of monthly labor force participation rates reported by the Current Population Survey that included nationally representative samples of the general U.
Cyclical changes in the job separation, job finding, and labor force participation rates are related directly to the movements in the cyclical component of real output.
Third, controlling for age and gender, participation rates for the overseas-born remain lower than they are for the Australian-born people.