participation rate

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Participation Rate

The number of persons in an economy who are willing to work, and are either working or looking for work as a percentage of the total labor force. The participation rate is one way to measure an economy's employment rate. See also: Discouraged worker.

participation rate

see ACTIVITY RATE.
References in periodicals archive ?
The study says the gap in employment participation rates between men and women is narrowing in developing and developed countries while it continues to widen in emerging countries.
Statistics also revealed that the labor force participation rates for male and female by age group are very significant and helpful.
Aggregate labor force participation rates in the United States are described focusing on educational attainment.
By measuring changes in participation rates and proportions of the population of various demographic groups, the authors present "counterfactual" scenarios in which rates are held constant in order to measure the impact of demographic changes, such as share of the population.
The comparison of rural and urban participation rates reveals that labour force participation rate is higher in rural areas as compared to urban areas because of agrarian economy.
Sheikh Khaled Arafat, a member of the Nasserist Al-Karama Party in North Sinai, told Daily News Egypt that voter participation rates have improved on Monday.
The paper notes first of all that the participation rates of Turkish educated women, according to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), are far below those of some developing countries.
The iceberg addressed here involves declining voluntary participation rates.
However, because participation rates have actually been falling for some demographic groups since well before the recession began, at times our analysis necessarily extends to earlier periods in order to properly frame more recent developments.
Employers that do bundle may experience additional and surprising benefits to their plans, though, in the form of higher participation rates and improved satisfaction with their provider.
However, those plans that report they use the overall participation rate as an indication of their program's success show only a slight improvement over plans not using this measurement: Participation rates are just 2% higher, deferral rates 7% higher, and average plan balances a negligible 0.
Many labor force participation studies during this period focused on the increasing participation rates of women.