Paradox of Voting


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Paradox of Voting

The idea that because the physical process of voting is inconvenient and each vote usually matters very little, the rational person should not vote. Yet large proportions of populations vote. The paradox occurs if one studies voters and other political actors in the same way as one would study rational economic actors.
References in periodicals archive ?
One of the fascinating aspects of this story is that another special case of Arrow's theorem, called the paradox of voting, had been discovered in the 18th century by a French mathematician and philosopher, the Marquis de Condorcet, and again in the 19th century by mathematician Charles Dodgson (better known by his literary nom de plume, Lewis Caroll), and independently once again by economist Duncan Black a bit before Arrow developed his theorem.
P is for what PUBLIC CHOICE THEORISTS call the PARADOX OF VOTING, which questions not why so few of us vote, but why so many.
A Mathematical Solution for the Probability of the Paradox of Voting.