test

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Related to Pap test: HPV, Pap smear, Pelvic exam

Test

The event of a price movement that approaches a support level or a resistance level established earlier by the market. A test is passed if prices do not go below the support or resistance level, and the test is failed if prices go on to new lows or highs.

test

The attempt by a stock price or a stock market average to break through a support level or a resistance level. For example, a stock that has declined to $20 on several occasions without moving lower may be expected to test this support level once again. Failing to fall below $20 one more time would be considered a successful test of the support level and a bullish sign for the stock.
References in periodicals archive ?
The pathology system of electronic medical records at The Methodist Hospital was searched for cervical histologic specimens with a diagnosis of CIN 2 or greater and a preceding Pap test result (within 1 year; July 1, 2010, through June 30, 2011).
Preventive Services Task Force called for Pap screening to begin no earlier than age 21 and within an interval of 3 years between routine Pap tests for women aged 22-30 years.
Three years ago, 84 percent of women in Oregon had Pap tests, but only 75 percent had a test in 2010 according to the Women's Health Report Card, published by Oregon Health & Science University and the National Law Center.
8 times higher risk of missing Pap test in past year (if their last pelvic exam was not at their usual HIV clinic)
Too many Pap tests are being done in older women as well.
Optional testing for women ages 65 to 70 with at least three normal Pap tests and no abnormal Pap tests in the past ten years.
This lack of screening represents 50 percent of the risk and is a factor that health professionals can influence by offering the Pap test to female patients.
Women who have had a hysterectomy should continue to have a Pap test every two to three years until age 65 or 70 if they had a history of high grade squamous intraepithelial lesions before they had the hysterectomy.
Yet cervical cancer is nearly 100 percent preventable with regular Pap test screenings.
The FDA initially approved the HPV DNA test in March 2000 for testing women who had abnormal Pap test results to determine whether they needed to be referred for further examination.
The procedure in question is the Pap test, and the threat is from juries that are awarding large sums to women with uterine or cervical cancer who have had any negative Pap test findings before the development of their cancer.