Peso

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Peso

The name of several currencies. The word originated as the Spanish term for a large, silver coin common in international trade in the 16th century. It is currently the name of currencies in several former colonies of Spain, particularly in Latin America. See also: Mexican peso.
References in periodicals archive ?
But at the same time, the sugar industry must now pay 7 pesos for a dollar of imports, instead of 1 peso.
No obstante esta diferencia no se aprecia cuando se analiza el peso posthemodialisis respecto al peso seco, segun sexo.
Los objetivos de este estudio fueron: (1) determinar el tamano corporal de los terneros Brahman y Red Brahman de una cabana de Corrientes (Argentina) utilizando la edad real y la alzada a la cadera ajustada por edad de la madre y sexo del ternero; (2) agrupar los individuos clasificandolos en terminos cualitativos como FS pequeno (1-3), mediano (4-7) y grande (7 o mas); (3) evaluar el efecto del FS en las variables: peso al nacimiento, peso al destete, ganancia diaria de peso y peso ajustado a los 210 dias de los terneros; y (4) evaluar el efecto de la raza en las variables ganancia diaria de peso y peso ajustado a los 210 dias de edad de los terneros destetados.
Asocolflores, the business group representing flower growers, says the strong peso has caused the sector's worst crisis in nearly half a century.
Two of the customers who showed up for lunch about noon Tuesday at the Anaheim Street store paid with pesos.
As a result, a pilot project has been created in which the dollars the IDB loans to Mexico will be converted to pesos for use by the states without the Mexican government being responsible for any future peso-dollar disparity as the loan is repaid over a 25-year period.
Princess Barbie was on sale for 288 pesos (about $20), He-Man action figures for 162.
The Central Bank said it would not intervene to prop up the peso.
Mexico's peso devalued more than 9 percent in the quarter.
The International Monetary Fund (IMF) allowed the Philippines to expand its budget deficit this year from the original target of 40 billion pesos, equivalent to 1.
A more understandable failing, given that financial authorities are often behind the curve in such matters, is that the Mexican authorities chose to prevent the development of forward or futures market contracts in pesos.
Major and continuous devaluations of a nation's currency have long been a reality of the global economy, with the recent peso crisis in Mexico among the more newsworthy.