Overstaffing


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Overstaffing

A situation in which a company hires more employees than it can afford to keep. Overstaffing may occur, for example, if a small business makes a point of employing all of the owner's children. It may also occur if a company hires staff in anticipation of increased business. Overstaffing may be unsustainable if the increased business does not materialize.
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A recent report in the "New York Times" found anecdotal evidence of enormous overstaffing in that city's subway-construction projects, especially when compared with countries such as France.
In 70% of the cases, overstaffing is recorded in the RPI at noon and they only require one shift per day, 20% of cases, 2 shifts and 10% of shifts per day.
ABI said "operational changes, increased efficiencies and fewer retirements than the company had anticipated" led to overstaffing.
Said a Deputy Inspector General requesting anonymity, "Due to overstaffing, the parking lots have become so congested that there is no space for vehicles of police officers.
It will therefore benefit from favourable conditions for the payment of the negotiated contracts, various measures to help deal with overstaffing and a preferential loan granted by the Finnish government.
While the manager may have thought that it was a good idea to schedule a bunch of employees to cover the lunch rush, his or her overstaffing was playing out to disastrous effect.
Overstaffing, while effective, brings with it higher operations costs and lower profit margins, as well as the overall deterioration of productivity as work rises to fill the void during normal work periods.
Therefore, managers should err on overstaffing, relieving any unnecessary personnel when needed, and consider assistance from other agencies if necessary.
Before raising taxes, he should find ways to improve city service by checking on the extent of idle labor on the city payroll or of overstaffing at all levels.
Nearly 700 jobs are to go at collapsed department store chain Allders which administrators said were necessary to remove overstaffing.
The administrators said the cuts - which are spread across most of its 45 stores - were necessary to remove overstaffing.
Our fear is overstaffing will be compensated by an increase in tickets issued - a worrying growth industry for Britain.