offshore

(redirected from Overseas Companies)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia.

Offshore

Describing an institution, especially a bank, that exists in a foreign country. Colloquially, the term refers to institutions that exist in known tax havens. Individuals and companies use offshore accounts to avoid or evade taxes in their home countries. As a result, some emerging financial centers have objected to being called "offshore," asking for parity with the developed financial world.

offshore

Of or relating to a financial organization whose headquarters lies outside the United States. Although offshore institutions must abide by U.S. regulations for operations carried on within the U.S., other activities generally escape domestic regulation.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Inbound Business Group has recognised an increasing number of overseas companies looking at expanding to and setting up in the United Kingdom, with the majority of enquiries originating from North America.
a company researching and brokering mergers and acquisitions, the headline figure includes investment by Japanese firms in overseas companies.
While this represents a reduction from the previous rate of 33 per cent, some overseas companies operating in China are used to 15 per cent, or less, and many others were granted tax holidays and other incentives.
Nikoli has copyright agreements with many overseas companies for the distribution of handmade Sudoku.
We buy oil, automobiles, electronics, and a vast array of other products from overseas companies.
The trip's aim was to pursue business matchmaking opportunities with overseas companies.
Already, overseas companies are diverting more and more goods to the East Coast from overloaded West Coast ports.
and Japan, and that it would have a severe negative impact on the Chinese economy, harm the interests of domestic and overseas companies in China, and affect the development of neighboring countries and the whole world.
Several overseas companies have offered to buy WR3A monitors at a higher price than usual, to test the theory they can avoid importing junk.
This is expected to eliminate the advantage that overseas companies had over their VAT-paying European rivals.
If we are to attract large overseas companies, a growing airport with good access may be critical in their choice to expand or re-locate there.

Full browser ?