Overemployment


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Overemployment

1. A situation in which a person consistently works more hours than they can sustainably work. That is, overemployment occurs when one is overworked. Some companies, such as brokerages and other major corporations, may encourage overemployment by promoting a culture in which those who work the most hours tend to receive promotions.

2. See: Overstaffing.
References in periodicals archive ?
Underemployment and overemployment increased risks of disease 1 to 3 months later (p < 0.
To illustrate this point simply consider Figure 1, which is capable of representing the losses of both under- and overemployment for a worker.
It can leave the wage bargainers free to exhibit over time a pattern of being sticky and immune to what other price incentives indicate as regards unemployment or overemployment.
Overemployment occurs when there are workers who are willing but unable to reduce their hours of work at their current or a comparable job, even if they are prepared to accept proportionately lower income.
Cost savings of $57,938 in this case study came from decreased sick leave, decreased recruitment, reduced overemployment, and reduced need for new employees to replace those on disability leave.
For example, as the Egyptian government maintained a high percentage of ownership of many corporations throughout the 1990s, inefficient overemployment at these organizations continued, and attempts to draw foreign investment into these companies failed.
As price hikes grow clearer with overcapacity and overemployment solved, the BOJ now must pay attention to the possibility of economic overheating as well as slowdown, a senior BOJ official said before the BOJ releases its semiannual Outlook for Economic Activity and Prices Friday.
15) In fact, as discussed more below, a larger group of women is working less than they would desire, and on balance, underemployment is at least as significant a problem for women as overemployment.
The accompanying tables, compiled from the last two volumes of the Return of Mares, show something of what is wrong in the industry, not least in the area of overemployment, but bear in mind that these are interim figures.
Surprisingly, the estimated production function exhibits decreasing economies of scale, explained by the authors with the presence of overemployment.
A test based on a comparison of hours changes associated with quits and layoffs in Altonji and Paxson (1986), as well as a substantial literature using self-reported measures of unemployment, underemployment, and overemployment (for example, Ham, 1982 and 1986; Kahn and Lang, 1988 and 1992; and Altonji and Paxson, 1988) suggests that workers face demand constraints that they cannot fully avoid by changing jobs.
Unemployment, under-employment and overemployment are the surprising ironies of our systems.