Over-Hedging

Over-Hedging

The practice of taking an offsetting position on an investment to reduce its risk where the offsetting position is greater than the original position. For example, one may buy 100 shares of AT&T and then buy a put option, giving one the right, but not the obligation, to sell 125 shares of AT&T. While this completely eliminates the risk associated with the first 100 shares declining in price, over-hedging creates a new risk for the extra 25 shares in the put contract.
References in periodicals archive ?
Companies should be wary of over-hedging their risks against high energy prices as the price could drop, leaving them holding the bag.
Over-hedging occurred in six months and under-hedging occurred during 12 months.
Where complete data isn't available, some companies may be conservative in their hedging strategies to avoid over-hedging.
On the other hand, four futures contracts would represent an over-hedging of C$58,000.
Mr Wheeler went on: 'This does not mean that hedging should be avoided it is of course essential to avoid undue risk but that over-hedging would not be cost-effective in the medium or long term.