Organized Labor

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Organized Labor

A group of employees in a certain company or with a certain skill who unite in a single body for purposes of negotiating wages, benefits, working conditions, and other issues with management. Members of an organized labor group must ratify decisions made by their representatives with management. Proponents of organized labor argue that it creates better working environments and played a significant role in creating the middle class in many countries. Critics contend that it creates economic inefficiency and can drive companies out of business with employees' high demands. In the United States, organized labor is regulated by the National Labor Relations Board. An organized labor group is called a union. See also: Strike.
References in periodicals archive ?
Ronald Holzhacker then provides a closer look at Germany, showing that alliances between organized labour and queer activists have only recently begun to offer the promise of growth and influence.
In addition to permitting some conclusions about what accounts for the growing number of alliances between organized labour and "sexual diversity activists" in the studied countries, this review also challenges the social movement orthodoxy that would characterize queer activism as "new" social movement activity and labour activism as "old" (or traditional) social movement activity.
It should also find a place in the personal libraries of anyone interested in organized labour, workplace equity, social movements, or queer history.
He has documented instances of cooperation between the New Left and organized labour.
Levy reminds the reader at several points that neither the New Left nor organized labour were monolithic.

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