Organized Labor


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Organized Labor

A group of employees in a certain company or with a certain skill who unite in a single body for purposes of negotiating wages, benefits, working conditions, and other issues with management. Members of an organized labor group must ratify decisions made by their representatives with management. Proponents of organized labor argue that it creates better working environments and played a significant role in creating the middle class in many countries. Critics contend that it creates economic inefficiency and can drive companies out of business with employees' high demands. In the United States, organized labor is regulated by the National Labor Relations Board. An organized labor group is called a union. See also: Strike.
References in periodicals archive ?
Numerous studies estimate PLAs increase project costs in the range of 10 to 20 percent, which means Patrick's deal with organized labor is costing taxpayers between $130 million and $260 million extra.
An industry where non-union workers toil alongside organized labor and fewer union workers do more of the work once seemed unthinkable in the city.
From Poland to Brazil to post-apartheid South Africa, organized labor has played a critical role in helping new democracies emerge and stabilize.
Therefore, one can reach the logical conclusion that much of what students know about organized labor comes from mass media sources.
In order for organized labor to play its critical role as a countervailing power within the American political system, there must be intensified organizing, internal democratization, increased electoral and lobbying clout, and social-movement unions willing to mobilize with others and, if necessary, on the streets.
But their lives and issues are usually ignored both by organized labor and by our own political organizations.
This issue is the brainchild of a committee with an unusual membership: six librarians and six representatives of organized labor.
What happened to organized labor in the 20th century?
Editorial includes information for every legislative area covered by BNA, including: agriculture, bankruptcy, biotechnology, campaign finance, telecommunications, energy, environment, financial institutions, futures trading, government contracts, health care, intellectual property, international trade, Internet law, organized labor, securities, and transportation.
Niblo explains how this highjacking of the Mexican Revolution was politically possible, given the apparent strength of organized labor and the Cardenista left without the ruling party.
Clinton was vastly prolific in his last three months, adding some 26,000 pages worth of dictates that ranged from creating new federal monuments, regulating the temperature at which eggs must be kept during shipping, and prohibiting companies that get on the wrong side of organized labor from contracting with the federal government.
The author states clearly in the final chapter that foundations and organized labour have the potential to be far more powerful when united than when working alone, "The most potent response in gaining public regard might be a common effort by organized labor and philanthropic foundations .

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