Open book

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Open book

Open Book

A situation in which a bank's liabilities have a shorter term (on average) than its assets. This indicates that it may not be able to meet its obligations when the time comes. It is also called an unmatched book or a short book.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Fractional Dehn Twist Coefficients (FDTC, in short) is a quasimorphism FDTC : G [right arrow] Q which plays an important role in contact 3-manifolds and open book decompositions [HKM1].
For an open book (S, g) we denote the corresponding 3-manifold by [M.
Open Books is at Bay Art, Bute Street, Cardiff Bay, until May 10
Open Books provides folders and reading logs to track the student's progress, note successes and express concerns about vision, hearing or learning disabilities.
As a personal commitment to the goals of literacy and service to others, Adam donated additional money to Open Books, Open Hearts in honor of his late mother, who died in August of 2002 from melanoma.
They must also be prepared to have their lives turned into open books by Washington's 5,000 resident journalists.
The L-shaped plans vaguely allude to open books, but the original cumbersome allusion has been diluted and refined by the weightless luminosity of the final built forms.
In parallel, we will work with our clients to create new business processing services, based on NaviSys technology and Accenture's global sourcing assets, to help life insurers reduce operating costs on closed books of business and on open books.
In this piece there was a more definite breach between appearance and structure, since at first the boat, here a single form, seemed to be made of open books tied together.
Henry is supposed to be African-Americn, preppy and well read: He's always cracking open books by Doris Lessing and Alice Munro when he has a bit of down time.
But it must be a transparent process with competitive bidding and open books -- otherwise, ratepayers are hurt and competitors are unfairly forced out of the market, stifling competition and driving electricity prices higher.
In a speech earlier this year at Northwestern University, Levitt stated, "Now is the time for all market participants to move toward open books across all markets.