Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1993

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Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1993

Legislation in the United States that raised taxes and cut some government spending in order to reduce the federal deficit. It cut spending on entitlement programs by $42 billion while creating higher tax brackets for some wealthy individuals and corporations. The Act came out of a theory that large deficits lead to inflation; this theory was rejected by both New Deal liberals and supply-side economics conservatives, both of whom believed that deficits are relatively unimportant. While the theory behind the Act remains controversial, it led to a projected budget surplus toward the end of the 1990s.
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This provision was later repealed by the Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1990, Pub.
7) Library of Congress, Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1993, 103rd Congress.
Just one example: Therapists' salaries in long-term care are not today what they were before the Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1997.
1990 The Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1990 (OBRA-90) modifies some of the requirements of OBRA-87, with a focus on residents' rights and the standards of care facilities must meet.
The act gives employees who lose their jobs because of increased competition with foreign imports more time to decide whether to continue receiving employer-provided benefits--at their own cost--under the Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act (COBRA).
The lawmakers agreed to give displaced workers a 65% advanceable and refundable tax credit that can be used to pay for health insurance under the Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act (COBRA) or for the purchase of certain state-based group coverage options.
In 1990, Congress passed the Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act as part of an effort to downsize federal deficits from the 1980s on luxury items such as yachts, private planes, expensive jewelry, furs, expensive automobiles and beer.
Congress is considering proposals to assist the unemployed who lose health insurance, including subsidizing Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act (COBRA) coverage, extending Medicaid eligibility, and providing states with grant money for premium assistance.
If you lose your health coverage when you leave your job, you may be able to buy "group coverage" for up to 18 months under a Federal law called the Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act or COBRA.
Following a decade-long acceleration of drug price inflation in the 1980s, Congress legislated a sweeping reform plan to contain Medicaid outpatient drug expenditures in the Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1990 (OBRA 90).
Under the Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1993, every state must try to get money back from the estates of former Medicaid recipients who were in long-term nursing-home care.
This opposition prompted Congress to end the federal desegregation assistance program in the 1981 Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act.