Monkey

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Monkey

In the United Kingdom, a slang term for 500 pounds.
References in periodicals archive ?
Old World monkeys are a diverse and widespread group, which includes African and Asian macaques, baboons, mangabeys, leaf monkeys and langurs.
The new report "makes a strong case that Old World monkeys and apes had already diverged 25 million years ago," says K.
The discovery, announced in the current issue of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, USA, is providing important clues as to when and how old world monkeys dispersed out of Africa and into Eurasia.
Studies of clock-like mutations in primate DNA have indicated that the split between apes and Old World monkeys occurred between 30 million and 25 million years ago.
Human laughter derives from the play invitation vocalizations of Old World monkeys and apes, but this is normally confined to juveniles and adolescents; adults don't play," he continued.
A mysterious kind of nerve cell that has been linked to empathy, self-awareness and even consciousness resides in Old World monkeys.
However, EVs isolated from Old World monkeys (OWMs) (principally Asian macaques) are grouped into species A and B; a separate simian species (SEV-A); or are unassigned (EV-108, SV6, and EV-103) (3).
A slope-faced, big-toothed creature from the distant past has led scientists to recalibrate the ancient evolutionary split between apes and Old World monkeys.
Simian T-cell lymphotropic viruses, enzootic in both Asian and African Old World monkeys and apes, may have repeatedly crossed the species barrier (7,8).
In another study, old world monkeys called Mangabeys were shown to modulate their begging behavior based on whether the experimenter was paying attention to them.
Still, the new findings indicate that some capacity for emotional interactions between mothers and infants evolved more than 30 million years ago in a common ancestor of humans, apes and Old World monkeys (including macaques), says psychologist Kim Bard of the University of Portsmouth in England.
Lip smacking is performed by all Old World monkeys and apes, including chimpanzees, and is used in friendly, face-to-face interactions.