Ohm

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Related to Ohm's law: Kirchoff's Law

Ohm

A Swedish unit of volume approximately equivalent to 150 liters.
References in periodicals archive ?
Figure 3 shows the electrical conductivity of the solutions measured by conductivity meter and calculated using Ohm's law versus vol% of water.
By neglecting spatial variations in solution concentration, the single particle model is able to: (1) represent each battery electrode by a single spherical diffusion particle (hence the model's name), (2) eliminate the need for solving Fick's law of diffusion for the solution, (3) replace Ohm's law for both the solid and electrolytic media by lumped equivalent resistors.
It's extraordinary to show that Ohm's Law, such a basic law, still holds even when constructing a wire from the fundamental building blocks of nature -- atoms," he says.
When students compute electrical circuit problems, they must identify the correct mathematical algorithm before computing the solution by using Ohm's Law.
Returning to the example of my personal verification of Ohm's law given earlier, I think it likely that PK could, in principle, affect an electrical current, and so could create apparent "violations" of Ohm's law.
Ohm's Law, V=IR, holds that voltage (V)equals current (I)times resistance (R).
This guide starts fledgling electricians on the basic mathematical concepts used in the field, and then moves through Ohm's Law, neutral conductors, common electrical equipment, load calculations and power efficiency.
Users have little time or inclination for priming pumps, unclogging injectors, hunting down tools, or poring through 350-page dissertations on Ohm's law.
IR" drop, according to Ohm's Law V=I*R, where R is the equivalent path DC resistance between the source location and the device location and I is the average current the chip draws from the supply).
He introduces the connection between the symbolic postulation of Ohm's Law and reality by describing the relationship between the abstract terms of the physicist such as 'current,' 'resistance,' 'electromotive force,' and the 'everyday English' terms such as 'wire,' 'position of the needle,' etc.
Each of the 28 Scouts could earn electrical, electronics and radio badges, learning Ohm's law, how to draw a schematic and how to spell their names in Morse code.
Since this exponent is so close to unity, the current essentially follows Ohm's law in this range of forward bias.