Occupational Taxes

Occupational Taxes

Taxes and fees levied on particular jobs and businesses. A liquor license for a bar and a health permit for a restaurant are both examples of occupational taxes. In the United States, occupational taxes are assessed at the state and local levels and generally are flat fees.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Examples of unreimbursed expenses for employees might include tools and supplies, occupational taxes, work uniforms, union dues and expenses for work-related travel.
The metro government is largely reliant on a variety of occupational taxes, which include an employee withholdings tax, a net profits tax, and a tax on insurance premiums (a combined 57% of fiscal 2016 general fund revenue).
Effective July 1, 2008, Section 11125 repeals the special occupational taxes on producers and marketers of alcoholic beverages.
The TTB reported that the payment of special occupational taxes will no longer be required from producers, wholesalers, importers, and retailers of alcohol beverages, as well as manufacturers of non-beverage products.
Annual occupational taxes are imposed on each premise of alcoholic beverage producers, wholesale distributors, and retailers.
The legislation includes a package of business tax breaks to compensate for the higher minimum wage, including higher deductions for business meals, a repeal of occupational taxes related to distilled spirits and wine, and an extension of a tax credit for businesses that hire certain employee groups.
Amend or repeal section 5121, which requires special occupational taxes on alcohol retailers.
The message contains the following reference to the occupational tax in the beverage field: "Change collection point of special taxes in connection with liquor occupations (included in 'liquor' are beer and wine) -To increase compliance rates and revenues, the special occupational taxes currently levied on retailers would be eliminated and the existing taxes on wholesalers and manufacturers would be increased effective October 1, 1990.
Neither FMI nor the National Grocers Association has figures on how many supermarket operators could be affected by the bureau's effort to collect unpaid special occupational taxes, but the industry consensus is that it is most likely to hit smaller operators.
The improvement revenue bonds are secured by a pledge of utilities tax, communication services tax, franchise fees, and occupational taxes imposed by the city, guaranteed entitlement revenues received from the state revenue sharing trust fund, and the city's share of local government half cent sales tax revenues collected within the county and shared with its municipalities pursuant to a population based formula.

Full browser ?