Nuclear Nonproliferation Act

Nuclear Nonproliferation Act

Legislation in the United States, passed in 1978, that revised previous law governing export of nuclear materials. It established safeguards so nuclear material would not be able to be used as part of a weapons program. It also increased financial aid and technical assistance to the International Atomic Energy Agency.
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If a subsequent arrangement described in the above paragraph involves a facility that has not processed spent nuclear reactor fuel prior to March 10, 1978 (when the Nuclear Nonproliferation Act of 1978 was enacted), the Secretaries of State and Energy must judge that the arrangement "will not result in a significant increase of the risk of proliferation.
Because the 1974 agreement did not comply with all the terms of the 1978 Nuclear Nonproliferation Act which amended the AEA, the two-year extension required legislative action.
nuclear nonproliferation policy are the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended by the Nuclear Nonproliferation Act of 1978, and the Arms Export Control Act of 1968.
The Atomic Energy Act of 1954 and Nuclear Nonproliferation Act of 1978 established controls on nuclear exports that gradually gained acceptance by other nuclear suppliers.
No, but the Nuclear Nonproliferation Act of 1978 made comprehensive International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) safeguards a requirement for nuclear cooperation with non-nuclear weapon states.
84) The language "fails to disapprove" is an artifact of the 1978 Nuclear Nonproliferation Act, which used legislative vetoes in the form of concurrent resolutions of disapproval.
Legislation abbreviations: AEA - Atomic Energy Act; AECA - Arms Export Control Act; EAA - Export Administration Act; FAA - Foreign Assistance Act; NNPA - Nuclear Nonproliferation Act of 1978; NPPA - Nuclear Proliferation Prevention Act.
The Department of Commerce oversees licensing of dual-use exports as mandated by Section 309(c) of the Nuclear Nonproliferation Act, which requires controls on "all export items, other than those licensed by the NRC, which could be, if used for purposes other than those for which the export is intended, of significance for nuclear explosive purposes.
President Carter signed Executive Order 12193, Nuclear Cooperation With EURATOM (45 Federal Register 9885, February 14, 1980), which permitted nuclear cooperation with the European Atomic Energy Community (EURATOM) to continue to March 10, 1981, despite the agreement's lack of a provision consistent with the intent of the Nuclear Nonproliferation Act requiring prior U.
They urged that an agreement be drafted so that none of the provisions of the Nuclear Nonproliferation Act of 1978 would be waived.
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