Normal portfolio

Normal portfolio

A customized benchmark that includes all the securities from which a manager normally chooses, weighted as the manager would weight them in a portfolio.

Normal Portfolio

The portfolio of investments a money manager ordinarily makes. If a money manager deviates from his/her investment strategy at any given time for any reason, a normal portfolio is useful to help the money manager (or his/her client) determine how the investments would have performed had he/she simply used his/her usual strategy. See also: Benchmark.
References in periodicals archive ?
Changes in the transaction size were driven by FX, normal portfolio movement, and other adjustments during the sign to close period.
Drivers for oil and gas M&A deals in 2010 include, (1) North American companies focusing on resource plays and divesting conventional and/or cash flowing assets, (2) capital needs for world class development projects, and (3) normal portfolio balancing and risk management.
As the benefits of sales and marketing services are realised SMAs are busy adding additional services to their normal portfolio.
A third benchmarking technique is known as normal portfolio, or portfolio opportunity, distribution.
The building block is the normal portfolio based on the investment manager's style.
In addition, the yields available on certain securities purchased in the course of normal portfolio management activity have been lower than those on securities tendered, called, matured or sold, which also contributed to the overall reduction in the level of income generated by the Fund.
The EBRD continues to be strongly committed to Lenta and is comfortable with its remaining stake in the company following today s partial sale, which was part of a normal portfolio management operation.
26, 2007, Tortoise Energy Infrastructure redeemed its Series E Auction Rate Notes totaling $70 million funded with proceeds from its bank revolver and normal portfolio turnover.
Management fees in the six-month period in 2004 were $8,220 lower versus 2003 as a result of normal portfolio depreciation which was only partially offset by the effect of the aircraft purchased in April 2004.
Management fees were $24,280 lower in 2004 versus 2003 as a result of normal portfolio depreciation.
In the course of normal portfolio management activity, the yields available on newly purchased securities have been lower than those of securities sold.
The effect of aircraft purchases in 2002 on management fees was offset by normal portfolio depreciation, resulting in no difference between management fees for the three-month period of 2003 versus 2002.