Nonfinancial assets

Nonfinancial assets

Physical assets such as real estate and machinery.

Nonfinancial Asset

In accounting, any asset that can be seen and touched. Non-financial assets include things that can be reproduced, such as widgets in a widget factory, and things than cannot be reproduced, such as the land upon which the widget factory is built. Non-financial assets are comparatively easy to price and, therefore, are often used to express the value of a company. However, because they do not include intangible (but still valuable) things like stocks and bonds, they may not truly express a company's value.
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Nonfinancial assets, specifically residential property, played an important role in that wealth accumulation, accounting for two-thirds of median household assets in 2013.
Fixed assets are produced nonfinancial assets that are used repeatedly, or continuously, in processes of production for more than 1 year.
The rise of shareholder value as the key metric for assessing stock price requires managers to consider adding value-oriented information to their corporate reports--such as the ways in which nonfinancial assets are expected to provide economic value and how today's innovation will translate into tomorrow's cash flow.
For every separate category of nonfinancial assets except "other," however, ownership rates fell.
At the same time, the top 10% also owned nonfinancial assets (including primary residences) with a median value of $756,400 -- nearly six times the value held by the other 90%.
The Deloitte report also warns that economic pressures inevitably raise the risk of impairment of financial and nonfinancial assets.
The report also showed that the value of nonfinancial assets increased from pounds 533billion in 1948 to pounds 2.
The report -Capital Stocks, Capital Consumption and Non Financial Balance Sheets - also showed the value of nonfinancial assets increased from pounds 533bn in 1948 to pounds 2.
Nonfinancial assets included the dollar value of business assets, equity in real estate (excluding primary housing), and transportation assets.
Under anti-Mafia legislation, seized financial and nonfinancial assets of organized crime groups can be forfeited.
Financial assets included such items as checking accounts, savings accounts, mutual funds, stocks, bonds, and retirement accounts, and nonfinancial assets included such items as homes, vehicles, other residential or nonresidential real estate, and business interests.
The recognition of exchange-based gain or loss with respect to nonfinancial assets was problematic because, in the view of the IRS and Treasury, movements in exchange rates with respect to these assets often do not result in currency gains or losses to their owners.