Noncustodial Parent

Noncustodial Parent

The noncustodial parent is the parent who does not have physical custody of the child or who has custody of the child for the samller part of the year.
References in periodicals archive ?
Kaitlyne Wirth is the noncustodial parent, police said, and had violated a court order when she took the child on Thursday.
Frequently, a couple's divorce decree or separation agreement will include a provision granting the noncustodial parent the dependency exemption for a child for some or all years.
In 2006, New York adopted a program known as the Noncustodial Parent EITC.
Under the new proposals, the noncustodial parent would be allowed to spend the same amount of time with their child as the custodial one provided strict criteria are met and the child agrees.
The noncustodial parent attaches the written declaration to his return for the appropriate tax year.
22) McLeod arguably stands for no more than that DOR may not accept as a Title IV-D client a noncustodial parent seeking a downward modification if neither parent nor the child has been on public assistance, the parties obtained the establishment order without DOR's services, and the custodial parent has enforced the order without DOR's services.
Baby Girl, focuses on two questions related to the Indian Child Welfare Act (ICWA): whether a noncustodial parent can invoke ICWA to block an adoption voluntarily and lawfully initiated by a non-Indian parent under state law, and whether IC WA's definition of "parent" includes an unwed biological father.
Still, most US courts allow the noncustodial parent to expose the child to his or her religious beliefs, so long as no effort is made to denigrate the faith of the custodial parent.
The parent with custody must obey rules that allow for the noncustodial parent to visit his or her children.
8) "Virtual visitation, also called Internet visitation, refers to the use of e-mail, instant messaging, webcams, and other Internet tools to provide regular contact between a noncustodial parent and his or her child.
Today, if the relocating parent can establish some lack of interest or involvement by the noncustodial parent, combined with a demonstration that the move is genuinely necessary and will enhance the child's lifestyle in some manner, the courts tend to permit the relocation.
For example, DOR may seek to enforce a child-support obligation against a noncustodial parent and later seek a reduction of that support order on the noncustodial parent's behalf.