Nominalism

(redirected from Nominalists)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

Nominalism

The legal principle that the dollar amount of a debt remains the same regardless of the inflation rate. Inflation and deflation, which both change the real value of repayment, do not affect the amount of a debt recorded on a balance sheet. In theory, this places risks on both the lender and the borrower, but, in practice, the lender has most of the risk, as inflation, which reduces the real value of repayment, is more likely than deflation.
References in periodicals archive ?
This gives us three different kinds of nominalist objects: abstract particular, concrete particulars, and concrete universals.
The nominalist view of the world combined with the idea that all our knowledge comes only from our senses and that our minds at birth were nothing but a blank slate lead to empiricism.
For if words have meaning by ways other than standing for an object, then Russell's requirement that the nominalist has to give an explanation of 'resemblance' seems to beg the question against the nominalist.
There are only two nonconstituent nominalist analyses possible: relational and austere nominalism.
Of course, this means engaging with that arch nominalist finger-poker Friedrich Nietzsche and all his marching armies of metaphors, metonyms and anthropomorphisms.
The running battle between realists and nominalists is among other things a question of '.
The Thomists accentuated God's reason, while the Nominalists accentuated God's will.
Could we not make the same gesture with regard to the quarrel between nominalists and realists with which I began?
Contrast this with what I'll call a nominalist position, on which the question of whether something is alive or dead is entirely settled by how we choose to use the English words "alive" and "dead," without invoking any further commitments about how the world is arranged.
The real drama of the poem (which Pinsky finds exciting) is Wintersian, in that it "includes the nominalist dilemma as one historical part of its sensibilities among others.
There has been a widespread view that species are only arbitrary artifacts of the human mind, as some nominalists, in particular, have claimed.
In the debate over same-sex "marriage," we are seeing a partial and greatly dumbed-down replay of the medieval debate between realists and nominalists.